— tagged with “riders”

Virgin of Guadalupe, I thank you, because the Black Rider saved me from the Death.

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Juan Manuel Perez was playing hide and seek with other kids and saw a black rider in the granary. He appeared out of blue and said to the boy that he would tell him about treasures hidden in this very place. Juan got very scared and prayed the Virgin of Guadalupe. After that, the rider disappeared. Juan has grown up and now offers the Virgin this retablo.

Monterrey
November 18, 1958

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The group “Las Coronelas” gives thanks to the Virgin of Guadalupe with this humble retablo for having the first place in the skirmisher national championship. They represented their state and proudly rose high the Mexican tradition.

San Juan del Rio, Queretaro

The sister Reyes, Lupita, Rosita and Margarita, skirmishers from Los Rosales ranch, thank Saint Michael the Archangel with this retablo because they do what they enjoy the most—the art of riding.

Zacatecas, 1964

The Pedro Ramirez’ father taught him how to ride a horse. But the horse got crazy, and Pedro fell down hitting his mug. He thanks the Holy Child of Atocha with this retablo for he only lost two teeth.

There was a legend in my town about a ghost of a villista who rode the horse on the Night of All Saints. I never believed that but that night I worked late in the mountains, and on the way back to my hut I bumped into that ghost. He told me to go with him to the Revolution. I prayed the Virgin of Zapopan, and that moment the ghost disappeared. I thank for I didn’t die of fear.

Ponciano Morales
Durango, Mexico

There was a legend in my town about a ghost of a villista who rode the horse on the Night of All Saints. I never believed that but that night I drank too much mezcal and on my way back to my hut I bumped into that ghost. He told me to go with him to the Revolution. I prayed the Virgin of San Juan, and that moment the ghost disappeared. I thank for I didn’t die of fear.

Feliciano Piña
Durango, Mexico

August 1925, Pancho Lopez was practicing throwing a lasso near by Zacatlan, and he hurt his balls. Since no remedy helped him, he asked Holy Child of Atocha for help. It helped, Pancho got cured. He thanks for that with this retablo.

Lorenza Gonzalez brings this retablo to Saint James thanking him because her old man broke off the bad habit after he saw the ghost of Agapito Treviño, or the White Horse.

Monterrey, 1911

When we were going by the old road to San Juan de los Lagos to sell apples we met the phantasm of the headless rider. He often appears to travelers and abducts them. When we saw him, we entrusted ourselves to the Virgin of the Rosary. Thanks to her divine protection, the ghost passed by without noticing us. My husband and I turned gray after that, but we arrived to the town and sold our apples.

The cavalryman Jorge Sanchez thanks the Apostle James with this retablo because he won the show jumping competition with his horse. And thanks to that he was decorated by the army.

I thank the Lord Jesus, because I only broke my index finger nail after a very scary accident with my horse in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Delfino Gonzalez was learning how to ride a horse, and the horse threw him off right on cactuses. He got seriously hurt. Delfino thanks Saint Jude for his quick recovery and also because he’s learned the right way to ride.